Sustainability Graduate Courses

Graduate Programs and Concentrations:

Graduate Courses:

Check out the offerings below for more information on sustainability education categories and courses (full course list and descriptions are listed below this categorized list):

  • General Environmental courses:
    BIOL 6045 (4) General Ecology
    (note: prerequisite requirement of BIOL 3840 Animal Biology, which also requires BIOL 2108)
    GEOS 6017 (4) Environmental Geology
    (note: prerequisite requirement of GEOL 1121K and CHEM 1211K)
    PH 7299 (4) Sampling of the Environment (analysis/field)
  • 1) Urban courses:
    GEOS 6764 (3) Urban Geography
    GEOS 8538 (4) Urban Health GIS
    PH 7300 (3) Urban Health
    PMAP 8331 (3) Urban Development and Sustainable Cities
    ANTH 6200 (4) Urban Anthropology
    (note: prerequisite requirement of ANTHRO 2020)
    GEOS 6650 (4) Applied Hydrology
    GEOS 6774 (3) Contemporary Urban Theory
    GEOS 6768 (3) Metropolitan Atlanta
    PH 7340 (3) Built Environment and Health
    PMAP 8311 (3) Urban Demography and Analysis
    PMAP 8341 (3) Urban Transportation and Planning
  • 2) Climate Science and Policy courses:
    GEOS 6784 (3) Climate Change
    PH 7296 (3) Climate Change and Public Health
    PMAP 8010 (3) Social Policy
    PMAP 8531 (3) Policy Analysis
    and 10 credits of electives outside of the track requirements
    Suggested electives:
    GEOS 8048 (4) Seminar in Climatology
  • 3) Water courses:
    GEOS 6003 (4) Aqueous Geochemistry
    GEOS 6646 (4) Water Resource Management
    GEOS 6650 (4) Applied Hydrology
    PH 7297 (3) Global Water Sanitation and Hygiene
    BIOL 6451 (4) Aquatic Pollution
    GEOS 6650 (4) Applied Hydrology
  • 4) Anthropology courses:
    (note: prerequisite requirement for all ANTH courses is ANTH 2020)
    ANTH 6490 (4) Globalization
    ANTH 6060 (4) Environmental Anthropology
    ANTH 6200 (4) Urban Anthropology
    PMAP 8010 (3) Social Policy
    PMAP 8531 (3) Policy Analysis
  • 5) Geosciences courses:
    GEOS 6515 (4) Qualitative Methods in Geography
    GEOS 6532 (4) GIS
    GEOS 8538 (4) Urban Health GIS

Appendix – Course Descriptions of Required Courses and Potential Electives

ANTH 6200 – URBAN ANTHROPOLOGY
Urban Anthropology.
Prerequisite: Anth 2020 or consent of the instructor.
Urban space and social stratification; theories of space, place, and identity; the city in the social imaginary.
4.000 Credit hours

ANTH 6240 – FOOD: HIS, ECO, & POL ECONOMY
Food: History, Ecology, and Political Economy.
Prerequisite: Anth 2010 or Anth 2020, or instructor’s consent.
Explores the cultural histories of foods or types of food that have had major impacts on global political economy, ecology, and culture from the 14th century to present day.
3.000 Credit hours

ANTH 6060 – ENVIRONMENTAL ANTHROPOLOGY
Environmental Anthropology.
Prerequisite: Anth 1102, 2010, 2020, or 2030 with grade of C or higher, or consent of instructor.
During this course we will examine how humans interact with and are influenced by environmental resources, as well as how our actions impact natural resources and ecological systems. Human populations and cultural groups are therefore (re)situated in nature. To explore environmental anthropology as a subfield, the course is structured as a survey of the discipline, examining topics such as historical ecology, population ecology, cultural constructions of “nature,” the anthropology of environmentalism, political ecology, and global environmental issues.
3.000 Credit hours

ANTH 6390 – DIET, DEMOGRAPHY, AND DISEASE
Diet, Demography, and Disease. Prerequisite: Anth 1102, 2010 or 2030 or consent of the instructor. Overview of human/disease interactions from prehistoric to contemporary populations. Emphasis on major social transformations such as sedentism, animal and plant domestication, urbanism, and globalism.
3.000 Credit hours

ANTH 6070 – ETHNOBOTANY
Ethnobotany is the study of the use of plants by humans. This course provides an overview of the field of ethnobotany and its methods. Students will explore how ethnobotanists collect, analyze, and interpret data and will learn some of the applications of ethnobotany outside of an academic setting.
3.000 Credit hours

ANTH 6490 – ANTHROPOLOGY OF GLOBALIZATION
The Anthropology of Globalization. Prerequisite: Anth 2020 with grade of C or higher. This course critically analyzes the concept of globalization by examining the various components that are often invoked in defining/discussing the concept and the current world structure. We will explicitly examine the anthropological components of globalization and determine the manner in which it shapes culture, constructions of identity, restrictions of the body, distributions of economic and natural resources, intercultural contact, and patterns of global inequality.
4.000 Credit hours

BIOL 6045K – GENERAL ECOLOGY
General Ecology.
Prerequisite: Biol 3840 or equivalent. Biol 3820 recommended.
Three lecture and three laboratory hours a week.
Principles governing distribution and abundance of organisms and their interaction.
4.000 Credit hours

BIOL 6050 – NATURAL ENVIRONMENT OF GEORGIA
The Natural Environment of Georgia. (Same as Geog 6050.)
Prerequisite: Biol 1104K or 2108K with grade of C or higher, and Geog 1113 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Three lecture hours a week with a one day weekend lab every other weekend.
Georgia is a state with great a diversity of natural communities, in large part because of the many different landscapes present in the state. Through readings, discussions, tests, field outings, projects and in-class exercises, students will become familiar with the principles involved in the structure and function of Georgia’s dwindling, but diverse, ecosystems. There will be an emphasis on plant communities and the physical environment, but animal communities and landscape management strategies will also be covered. Locations, diversity, and plant indicator species (especially trees) will be examined in the classroom and in the field, and experiential learning is emphasized.
4.000 Credit hours

BIOL 6430 – MICROBIAL DIVERSITY/SYSTEMATCS
Microbial Diversity/Systematics.
Prerequisite: Biol 3880 or equivalent course work.
Four lecture hours per week.
Diversity and systematics of selected groups of bacteria and yeasts.
4.000 Credit hours

BIOL 6438 – APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY
Applied Microbiology.
Prerequistes: Biol 3880 and Chem 2400, or equivalent course work.
Four lecture hours a week.
Microbiology of industrial processes, including quality control, fermentations, biotransformations, strain selection and maintenance.
4.000 Credit hours

BIOL 6451 – AQUATIC POLLUTION & TOXICOLOGY
Aquatic Pollution and Toxicology.
Prerequisite: Biol 2108K, Chem 1212K. Chem 2400 recommended.
Four lecture hours per week.
Comprehensive introduction to water pollution (including relevant methods and techniques) and its relationship to public health.
4.000 Credit hours

BIOL 6458 – MICROBIAL ECOLOGY & METABOLISM
Microbial Ecology and Metabolism.
Prerequisites: Biol 3880 and Chem 2400, or equivalent course work.
Four lecture hours a week.
Application of ecological principles to the microbial world.
Topics include biogeochemical cycling, biogradation, bacterial communication and the ecology of disease.
4.000 Credit hours

BIOL 6480 – PRINCIPLES OF TOXICOLOGY
Principles of Toxicology.
Prerequisite: Biol 2108K or equivalent. Chem 4600 is recommended.
Four lecture hours a week.
Studies of the absorption, distribution and excretion of toxicants; their detoxication, and bioactivation; their adverse effects.
4.000 Credit hours

BIOL 6545 – BIOETHICS AND BIOTECH
Bioethics and Biotechnology.
Prerequisite: Biol 3900 with a C or higher, or equivalent.
Four lecture hours a week.
Ethical issues raised by recent advances in biotechnology, genomics, and other areas of molecular genetics and cell biology. Specific topics include: eugenics; molecular, cellular and organismal cloning; personalized medicine; stem cell research; the genetics of behavior; and the role of epigenetics in the nature vs. nurture debate.
4.000 Credit hours

BIOL 6640 – FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOINFORMATICS
Fundamentals of Bioinformatics.
Prerequisites: Biol 3800 or written approval of instructor. (Same as Chem 6640, CSc 6640, and Neur 6320.)
Four lecture hours per week.
A “hands-on” approach to bioinformatics using PCs, the internet, and computer graphics to analyze, correlate, and extract information from biological databases, emphasizing sequence and structure databases for proteins and nucleic acids, and introducing the computing skills necessary for bioinformatics. Topics include: sequences and three-dimensional structures of proteins and nucleic acids, the major databases, algorithms for sequence comparison, data mining, and prediction of structure and function.
4.000 Credit hours

BIOL 6648 – BIOGEOGRAPHY
Biogeography. (Same as Geog 6648.)
Prerequisites: Geog 1112, Biol 1104K, or Biol 2108K with grade of B or higher, or consent of instructor.
Spatial variations, processes, and environmental constraints influencing distribution of life.
4.000 Credit hours

BIOL 6694 – BIOSAFETY: PRINCIPLES & PRAC
Biosafety: Principles and Practice.
Prerequisites: Biol 3800 or consent of instructor.
Four lecture hours per week.
The discussion of pathogenic agents and their associated occupational and public health risks. Topics include emerging biosafety issues such as bioterrorism, human gene therapy, and federal and state regulations guiding use of pathogenic organisms.
4.000 Credit hours

BIOL 6744 – BIOSTATISTICS
Biostatistics.
Prerequisites: Math 2211 and Biol 2108K, or equivalents. (Same as Math 6544.)
Three lecture hours a week.
Principles and methods of statistics as applied to biology and medicine.
3.000 Credit hours

BIOL 6905 – THEME-BASED BIOLOGY LABORATORY
Theme-Based Biology Laboratory.
Prerequisite: Biol 3810 with grade of C or higher.
Students will work in small groups to develop specific biological hypotheses, design and carry out experiments to test these hypotheses, and analyze the results they obtain. May be repeated for credit if topic is different.
2.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours

BIOL 7020 – INTRODUCTION TO MARINE BIOLOGY
Introduction to Marine Biology.
Prerequisite: Biol 1104K, 1108K, or 2108K with grade of B or higher, or equivalent.
A comprehensive overview of the marine environment, including the characteristics of marine organisms and their distinctive communities, such as coral reefs, kelp forests, seagrass beds, and the deep ocean.
3.000 Credit hours

BIOL 8410 – ADVANCED MICROBIOLOGY
Advanced Microbiology.
Prerequisite: Biol 7880, or equivalent.
Four lecture hours a week.
In depth study of the organismal aspects of microbiology with particular emphasis on metabolic functions in eukaryotic microorganisms.
4.000 Credit hours

BIOL 8415 – FERMENTATION MICROBIOLOGY
Fermentation Microbiology.
Prerequisite: Biol 3880 or equivalent.
To familiarize the advanced student with the issues, problems, fundamentals, and approaches to the scale-up of microbiological processes. Selected team/group demonstrations and tutorials will be conducted with the students to illustrate and reinforce the concepts and examples provided in the lectures.
3.000 Credit hours

BIOL 8458 – ADVANCED MICROBIAL ECOLOGY
Advanced Microbial Ecology.
Prerequisites: Biol 3880 and Chem 4600 with grades of C or higher, or equivalent course work.
Four lecture hours per week.
Microbial interactions with their biotic and abiotic environments, with an emphasis on ecological principles, experimental approaches and current literature.
4.000 Credit hours

BIOL 8630 – ADVANCED BIOINFORMATICS
Advanced Bioinformatics.
Prerequisites: Biol 6640 or equivalent, ability to program in Java or C++ or equivalent, and consent of instructor. (Same as Chem 8630, CSc 8630, and Neur 8350.)
Advanced topics in bioinformatics, computer and internet tools, and their applications. Computer skills for the analysis and extraction of functional information from biological databases for sequence and structure of nucleic acids and proteins. Students will complete a computer-based bioinformatics project.
4.000 Credit hours

BIOL 8910 – TOPICS IN BIOLOGY
Topics in Biology. May be repeated if topics vary.
3.000 Credit hours

BIOL 8980 – TOPS-APPLIED/ENVIRON MICROBIOL
Topics in Applied and Environmental Microbiology. May be repeated if topics vary.
1.000 Credit hours

CHEM 6670 – P AND T OF BIOCHEMISTRY
Principles and Techniques of Practical Biochemistry.
Prerequisite: One semester of biochemistry (Chem 4600/6600) with grade of B or higher, or equivalent.
This course is cross listed with Biol 4670/6670. A comprehensive and integrated review of principles and modern techniques found in day-to-day biochemical research laboratories.
Topics include, but are not limited to: general principles of biochemical investigations, molecular biology and basic techniques, molecular cloning and gene analysis, protein structure, purification and characterization, biomolecular interactions, basic enzyme analysis, spectroscopic techniques, mass spectrometric techniques, centrifugation, electrophoretic, chromatographic, radioisotope and electrochemical techniques.
3.000 Credit hours

CHEM 8620 – ADV TOPICS IN BIOCHEMISTRY
Advanced Topics in Biochemistry. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Biochemical areas emphasized may include carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids, proteins, enzymes, immunochemistry, electron transport, and oxidative and photosynthetic phosphorylation. May be repeated if topics vary.
3.000 Credit hours

CHEM 8970 – TOP IN MOLECULAR BIO SCIENCES
Topics in Molecular Biological Sciences. (Same as Biol 8970.)
May be repeated if topics vary. May be taken for one or two credit hours.
1.000 TO 2.000 Credit hours

GEOS 6003 – AQUEOUS GEOCHEMISTRY
Aqueous Geochemistry.
Prerequisites: Geol 1121K, 1122K, Math 2212, and Chem 1212K. (Same as Geog 6680.)
Four lecture hours a week.
Theoretical aspects of aquatic chemistry with applications to natural water systems. Major topics include thermodynamic theory, sorption systematics, oxidation-reduction reactions, mineral-water interaction, and isotope geochemistry applied to hydrogeology.
4.000 Credit hours

GEOS 6005 – GEOLOGY OF GEORGIA
Geology of Georgia.
Prerequisite: Geol 1121K, or equivalent, or consent of the instructor.
One lecture hour a week.
A minimum of five days in the field must be fulfilled to receive credit in the course. Before enrolling in the course, students should confirm in advance their availability on announced weekends.
Nature, distribution, and significance of lithologies, structures, and ages of rocks in Georgia and other southeastern states. Geologic and tectonic history of the southern Appalachians, with emphasis on plate tectonic models. Critical discussion of the literature with emphasis on notable controversies.
3.000 Credit hours

GEOS 6006 – SEDIMENTARY ENVIR & STRATIGRAPHY
Sedimentary Environments and Stratigraphy.
Prerequisite: Geol 3002.
Three lecture and three laboratory hours a week, plus field trips.
Properties of sediments; origin, classification, and description of sedimentary rocks; principles of stratigraphy; analysis of sedimentary facies and environments of deposition.
4.000 Credit hours

GEOS 6017 – ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY
Environmental Geology.
Prerequisites: Geol 1121K and Chem 1211K.
Four lecture hours per week.
Application of geological and geochemical concepts to the study of Earth’s near surface environment. Topics may include water supply and pollution, global warming, ozone depletion, soil contamination, natural disasters, mineral resources, environmental management, and selected regulations. Quantitative treatment of population growth and water resources.
4.000 Credit hours

GEOS 6120 – BASIC FIELD GEOLOGY
Basic Field Geology.
Prerequisites: Completion of a core-curriculum science sequence and consent of instructor.
Nine hours a day, six days a week, for three weeks.
Introduction to field geology in the Rocky Mountains of Montana, with emphasis on basic concepts and field methods. Construction of simple geologic maps, cross sections, and stratigraphic columns, using topographic maps and aerial photographs in the field. Includes a seven-day excursion to geologically interesting areas of the U.S. Northwest. Open to teachers and students majoring in Geography, Anthropology Biology, Environmental Science, or others who are seeking a geological field experience.
3.000 Credit hours

GEOS 6515 – QUALITATIVE METHODS IN GEOGRAPHY
Qualitative Methods in Geography.
This course provides the theoretical knowledge and practical skills required to carry out qualitative research in geography. It focuses on the need and merits of qualitative research, the “how to” of various qualitative research methods, and issues related to ethics, the researcher-researched relationship, and positionality.
4.000 Credit hours

GEOS 6532 – GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS
Introduction to Geographic Information Systems.
Prerequisite: Geog 2206 or 6518 with grade of C or higher, or consent of instructor.
Fundamental concepts and applications of raster and vector-based geographic information systems involving the integration and synthesis of geographic data with map overlays, databases, computer graphics, and/or remote sensing imagery.
4.000 Credit hours

GEOS 6534 – ADVANCED GEOGRAPHIC INFO SYS
Advanced Geographic Information Systems.
Prerequisite: Geog 6532 with grade of C or higher, or consent of instructor.
Advanced concepts of geographic information systems including an examination of a variety of applications of GIS technology.
4.000 Credit hours

GEOS 6538 – URBAN HEALTH GIS
Urban Health Geographic Information Systems.
The course is an upper-level undergraduate course to graduate level course developed to introduce students to measurement and analysis associated with spatial patterns of diseases. This course is proposed to address contemporary diseases of public health importance and present the quantitative skills that can be used in understanding how spatial patterns arise and what they imply for intervention.
Objectives of the courses: (1) examine patterns of disease in place and time; (2) apply geospatial technologies and methods in public health; (3) examine diffusion of disease; and (4) conduct spatial epidemiological studies of selected infectious and noninfectious diseases. By the end of the course, students will gain hands-on experience with a variety of methods and GIS tools useful for the spatial analysis of medical data.
4.000 Credit hours

GEOS 6644 – ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION
Environmental Conservation.
Prerequisites: Geol 1121K/1122K or Geog 1112/1113 with grade of B or higher, or consent of instructor. (Same as Geol 6644.)
Social and policy perspectives of natural resource management; development of the American conservation movement, federal land policy, and significant environmental legislation; analysis of local and global environmental issues.
4.000 Credit hours

GEOS 6646 – WATER RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
Water Resource Management.
Prerequisites: Geog 1112/1113 or Geol 1112K, or consent of instructor.
General characteristics of water resources, principles and methodology, planning procedures, political, socioeconomic, and legal aspects of water resources management.
4.000 Credit hours

GEOS 6648 – BIOGEOGRAPHY
Biogeography.
Prerequisites: Geog 1112 and Biol 1152K with grade of B or higher, or consent of instructor.
Spatial variations, processes, and environmental constraints influencing the distribution of life.
4.000 Credit hours

GEOS 6650 – APPLIED HYDROLOGY
Applied Hydrology.
Prerequisites: Geog 1112/1113 or Geol 1112K with grade of C or higher, or consent of instructor. (Same as Geol 6650.)
Three lecture and two lab hours per week.
Application of principles of hydrology to urban development, flood forecasting, agriculture and forestry, and water resources management; statistical and modeling techniques in hydrology.
4.000 Credit hours

GEOS 6762 – ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY
Economic Geography.
Systematic examination of the changing world economic system including traditional and modern agriculture, manufacturing, and service activity in both developing and developed areas.
4.000 Credit hours

GEOS 6764 – URBAN GEOGRAPHY
Urban Geography.
Comparative study of the location, function, and internal spatial structure of urban area. Special attention given to the impact of transportation, residential, commercial, and industrial activity on the changing form of cities and suburbs.
4.000 Credit hours

GEOS 6768 – METROPOLITAN ATLANTA
Metropolitan Atlanta. (Same as Hist 6320 and Soci 6279.)
Interdisciplinary perspective focusing on social, historical, and geographic processes which have shaped the Atlanta region.
3.000 Credit hours

GEOS 6774 – CONTEMP URBAN THEORY & ISSUES
Contemporary Urban Theory and Issues.
An examination of urban geographical theory as a framework for understanding contemporary cities in the United States.
3.000 Credit hours

GEOS 6782 – ENVIRONMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY
Environmental Psychology.
Prerequisite: Psyc 1101 with grade of C or higher. (Same as Psyc 6520.)
Introduction to environmental psychology focusing on the relations between individuals and their natural and built environments. Topics include cognitive mapping of physical space, stress, crowding, and the applications of psychology to alleviating environmental problems.
3.000 Credit hours

GEOS 6784 – CLIMATIC CHANGE
Climatic Change.
Prerequisite: Geog 1112 with grade of C or higher, or consent of instructor.
An assessment of the understanding of many aspects of recent climatic change. The focus is on how human activities can cause climatic change as well as how humans and ecosystems can be affected by those changes. Specific topics will include technical aspects of climatic observations and modeling, actual and potential impacts of climatic change on human and natural systems, and climatic-change influences on public policy.
3.000 Credit hours

GEOS 8005 – ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY
Economic Geography.
Prerequisite: consent of the instructor.
Analysis of selected topics and regions dealing with the geographical structure of economic systems. May be repeated if topics vary.
3.000 Credit hours

GEOS 8010 – SEMINAR IN URBAN-ECONOMIC GEOG
Seminar in Urban-Economic Geography.
Advanced topics in regional analysis. May be repeated if topics vary.
4.000 Credit hours

GEOS 8045 – SEMINAR IN BIOGEOGRAPHY
Seminar in Biogeography.
Prerequisite: Geog 6648 with grade of B or higher, or consent of instructor.
Advanced topics in theories and research methods of biogeography. May be repeated if topics vary.
4.000 Credit hours

GEOS 8048 – SEMINAR IN CLIMATOLOGY
Seminar in Climatology.
Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Examination of theoretical and applied aspects of climatological research in the discipline of Geography. May be repeated if topics vary.
4.000 Credit hours

GEOS 8050 – SEMINAR: ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES
Seminar in Environmental Issues.
Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. (Same as Geol 8050.)
Various environmental issues confronting society. May be repeated if topics vary.
4.000 Credit hours

GEOS 8538 – URBAN HEALTH GIS
Urban Health Geographic Information Systems.
The course is an upper-level undergraduate course to graduate level course developed to introduce students to measurement and analysis associated with spatial patterns of diseases. This course is proposed to address contemporary diseases of public health importance and present the quantitative skills that can be used in understanding how spatial patterns arise and what they imply for intervention. Objectives of the courses: (1) examine patterns of disease in place and time; (2) apply geospatial technologies and methods in public health; (3) examine diffusion of disease; and (4) conduct spatial epidemiological studies of selected infectious and noninfectious diseases. By the end of the course, students will gain hands-on experience with a variety of methods and GIS tools useful for the spatial analysis of medical data.
4.000 Credit hours

NEUR 6420 – HORMONES AND BEHAVIOR
Hormones and Behavior.
Prerequisite: Biol 3840 or equivalent. (Sames as Biol 6241 and Psyc 6630.)
Four lecture hours per week.
Interaction of nervous and endocrine systems in the control of animal behavior, including humans, with emphasis on the mechanisms that adapt behavior to the changing physical and social environments.
4.000 Credit hours

NEUR 6500 – PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE
Philosophy of Science. (Same as Phil 6130.)
Varieties of scientific explanation; hypothesis formation and confirmation; paradigms, laws, and theories; the status of un-observable entities; holism and reductionism; science and values, nature and scope of scientific progress; limits of scientific explanation.
3.000 Credit hours

NEUR 6510 – PHILOSOPHY & COGNITIVE SCIENCE
Philosophy and Cognitive Science. (Same as Phil 6340.)
An interdisciplinary examination of the problems, theories, and research strategies central to the study of the human mind and of other cognitive systems. Basic readings will come from a variety of disciplines, including philosophy, neuroscience, and psychology. Topics of investigation may include perception, mental representation, language, modularity, consciousness, emotions, moral psychology, action, mental disorders, folk psychology, and animal minds.
3.000 Credit hours

NEUR 7400 – PSYCHOLOGY OF ANIMAL BEHAVIOR
Psychology of Animal Behavior. (Same as Psyc 7560.)
Psychological, genetic, physiological, and ecological bases of animal behavior. Basic adaptive mechanisms and their importance for understanding human behavior.
3.000 Credit hours

PH 7293 – ENVIRON HEALTH TOXICOLOGY
Environmental Health Toxicology.
This course surveys the fundamentals of exposure to chemical agents of human health importance in the environment, including natural, occupational, and built environments. Topics include distribution, absorption, metabolic conversion, and elimination of agents in the human body, as well as mechanisms of injury at the systemic, organ, and cellular level. Chemical structures and detection methods for chemical agents in the environment will also be covered.
3.000 Credit hours

PH 7295 – TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL EPI
Topics in Environmental Epidemiology.
Prerequisites: PH7011, PH7150.
This course will review of the main types of epidemiological study designs, the principles of exposure assessment (identify hazards, media and pathways then quantitative and qualitative measures, including before and after physical and/or educational inventions), and the basic components of health impact/risk assessment, management and communication. The course explores important historical and contemporary exposure-to-disease relationships due to the contamination of waters (drinking water, surface water and ground water aquifers) and of air (outdoors and inside homes, schools, offices and industrial settings). Students will undertake critical reviews of research study designs, measurement of exposure and health outcomes, and interpretation of the statistical results.
3.000 Credit hours

PH 7296 – CLIMATE CHANGE & PUBLIC HEALTH
Climate Change and Public Health.
The course will offer an overview of challenges climate change poses to our health. It will also examine the current evidence on health impact of climate change and emphasize the importance of geography and global health in the context of climate change.
3.000 Credit hours

PH 7297 – GLOBAL WATER SANITA & HYGIENE
Global Water, Sanitation & Hygiene.
This course will emphasize water, sanitation and hygiene in both developing and developed countries from an environmental health perspective. We will examine effective, appropriate, accessible and affordable measures to reduce the global burden of disease from environmental exposures. We will thoroughly examine the risk-based framework that uses risk assessments of health effects from exposures to pathogenic (disease-causing) microbes and toxic chemicals in environmental media. Exposures to various agents of health concerns via water, wastes, air, vectors and other transmission routes will be considered, as will the various prevention and control measures intended to reduce these exposures.
3.000 Credit hours

PH 7299 – SAMPLING OF THE ENVIRONMENT
Sampling of the Environment.
This course is a hands-on laboratory where students will perform sampling of the physical environment and environmental media to assess health risks. Topics will include analysis of food, water, and air quality, as well as assessment of the built environment and occupational hazards. Students will learn sampling techniques, laboratory analysis, and collection and interpretation of environmental quality data. Previous lab experience is not required.
3.000 Credit hours

PH 7300 – URBAN HEALTH
Urban Health.
Disparities in health status are increasingly apparent in urban settings. Urban residents tend to have higher rates of cancer, heart disease, mental illness, substance abuse, HIV/AIDS and violent behavior than national averages. This course will examine the condition of urban health in America with particular focus on the health status of those living in the city of Atlanta. In addition, the possible determinants of poor health outcomes in urban areas will be examined, including issues such as poverty, housing, access to care, and discrimination. This course will showcase the research of the Georgia State University faculty participating in GSU’s “Partnership for Urban Health Research.”
3.000 Credit hours

PH 7325 – URBAN HEALTH SEMINAR
Urban Health Seminar.
The Urban Health Seminar will feature presentations of research and research topics currently under consideration by the Georgia State University Partnership for Urban Health Research. Research topics, methods, strengths, limitations, findings, and implications will be presented and discussed with learners. The presentations in class will illustrate the interdisciplinary nature of the field of urban health.
1.000 Credit hours

PH 7340 – BUILT ENVIRON AND HEALTH
Built Environment and Health.
This interdisciplinary course examines how features in the built environment of cities and their neighborhoods have effects – both positive and adverse – on human health. We consider how decisions about land use, urban design, transportation, public facilities, and housing are made, followed by an examination of the associated health consequences of these decisions. The course considers built environment impacts on physical activity, obesity, air quality, and the health of vulnerable populations, among other health issues. The wide array of actors who are responsible for making the places where we live, work, play and learn are considered. Through lectures, seminar discussions, guest speakers, and field exercises, students will interact with individuals from a variety of disciplines to investigate the broad range of elements necessary to foster healthy places.
3.000 Credit hours

PMAP 8010 – SOCIAL POLICY
Social Policy.
This course introduces students to contemporary social policy questions in the U. S. and how to analyze policy alternatives for addressing these questions. Specific social policy issues are chosen for discussion on the basis of their relevance to current public policy debates.
3.000 Credit hours

PMAP 8141 – MICROECON FOR PUB POLICY
Microeconomics for Public Policy.
The purpose of this course is to introduce principles of microeconomics to students for use when analyzing public policy for effective public administration and planning. The course will consider basic concepts of microeconomic principles including market failure, public goods, supply and demand, pricing, and externalities. These concepts will be presented using practical examples involving the public sector, and students will practice application through problem solving.
3.000 Credit hours

PMAP 8171 – MANAGEMENT SYS & STRATEGIES
Public Management Systems and Strategies.
Analysis of contemporary approaches to the management of public and nonprofit organizations focusing primarily on problem-solving strategies and techniques for use at the executive and operating levels.
3.000 Credit hours

PMAP 8210 – INTRO TO THE NONPROFIT SECTOR
The Nonprofit Sector.
The course provides an overview of the nonprofit sector in society with a consideration of the nonprofit sector’s relationship to the state and to for-profit sectors. Attention will be given to the social settings in which nonprofit organizations exist, and to contemporary public policy issues regarding the nonprofit sector.
3.000 Credit hours

PMAP 8311 – URBAN DEMOGRAPHY AND ANALYSIS
Urban Demography and Analysis.
This course addresses the role of demography in urban policy and planning, and the impact of a changing population and their activities on our cities and communities. This course makes in-depth use of the U.S. census data in deriving measurements and conducting analysis on regional and local economic and social conditions with emphasis on both the spatial and temporal perspectives. Substantive topics to be discussed include racial/ethnic composition, immigration, housing, employment, poverty and economic development, transportation, as well as land use and urban spatial structure.
3.000 Credit hours

PMAP 8331 – URBAN DEV & SUSTAINABLE CITIES
Urban Development and Sustainable Cities.
Causes and consequences of urban development and growth management are introduced in the light of economics and public policy theories, within the context of legal and constitutional framework. In addition to prevalent growth patterns (e.g. sprawl vs. smart growth), issues related to the physical and environmental dimension of urban development such as infrastructure, sustainable environment, housing, transportation are discussed in detail.
3.000 Credit hours

PMAP 8341 – URBAN TRANSPORTATION PLANNING
Urban Transportation Planning.
This course will cover automobile, public transit, airport, bicycle, pedestrian, and non-traditional transportation modes. Land use, sprawl, demand management, coordinated human services, and project prioritization are topics which will be covered.
3.000 Credit hours

PMAP 8531 – POLICY ANALYSIS
Policy Analysis.
Prerequisite: PMAP 8131 or consent of the instructor.
This course provides focused study about policy analysis and process techniques. This course concentrates on policy development decision strategies. Students will conduct problem solving exercises using a number of decision methods appropriate to policy analysis and evaluation. Students will leave the course with an understanding of the policy-making process at all levels of government and a knowledge of different techniques available to develop, implement, and assess policy initiatives.
3.000 Credit hours